Tag: companion animal

Love and Compassion–Essential to Humanity

Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them humanity cannot survive.” – Dalai Lama

On Valentine’s Day, we celebrate our love for others through gifts, flowers, or other expressions of our feelings. Daily, we may observe acts of love and compassion, but not fully appreciate how important these traits are to our feelings of fulfillment and belonging. We are fortunate to work in an environment that celebrates the human-animal bond, which at its core is a mutually beneficial relationship between animals and people, reflected in emotional, psychological, and physical interactions. Scientific research has verified the physiologic effects on both pet parents and dogs who are bonded. Anyone who has been emotionally touched by their pets understands the depths of our love for animals.

Dean Lairmore surrounded by students at the Knights Landing One Health clinic.

We extend our compassion to our community in a variety of outreach programs such as our student-run Mercer and Knights Landing Clinics. These clinics provide healthcare for pets of those in need, but who lack adequate resources. I recently visited our Knights Landing One Health Clinic on a busy Sunday morning. The clinic was a hub of activity with more than thirty students, volunteers, and clients gathered in the local community center. The compassion and dedication of our students was on full display as they interviewed clients and examined anxious pets on make-shift exam tables. Our students’ desire to serve the underserved of our society is a clear expression of their humanity.

Another form of compassion is expressed for our co-workers in their times of need. We express sympathy towards our co-workers following the loss of a family member or in times of severe stress. In addition, while less obvious, we show we care in small acts of daily kindness. The affirmative effects of kindness are experienced in the giver and to those that witness the act of kindness, spreading good feelings and positively influencing the work environment. As we envision our future, we must acknowledge the importance of compassion in solidifying the bonds between us that bring satisfaction in our work and warmth to our souls.

Compassion and love do not always extend to others, but may be just as important when inwardly directed. We must also forgive ourselves and have sympathy for our faults. We need to be aware of our own feelings to be in touch with our thoughts and moods. Self-awareness and the ability to forgive ourselves promote positive feelings and improves our resilience to life’s demands. Taking the time to pause our lives for health and wellness serves to bring self-compassion into our daily routines. When love and compassion become incorporated into our habits, we view them not as isolated gestures, but vital components to our productivity, and critical to our work satisfaction.

Celebrate the Act of Giving

“It is literally true that you can succeed best and quickest by helping others to succeed.” -Napoleon Hill

Students at the 2016 Evening of Gratitude.

We celebrate the act of giving to others and creating dreams during our annual “Evening of Gratitude.” This is a special night and one that I look forward to each year. Our school’s 2017 scholarship and grant program provided $6.7 million in total support for our students this year! We are deeply grateful for the generous support of our individual, association and corporate scholarship donors who make these new and continuing awards possible.

Dr. Anjolie Daryani with her service dog, Ebony, who accompanied her to classes and events, including commencement.

An example of new investments in our students included the “Ebony Compassionate Care Scholarship Fund” created by Dr. Dustin Noack (DVM, 2014), our first Evening of Gratitude speaker, and Dr. Anjolie Daryani (DVM, 2015) for a student who demonstrates exceptional compassionate care for animals. Their compassion will pay forward to benefit the next generation of veterinarians from UC Davis.

Read More

Dean’s Perspective: Value of Human-Animal Bond

“Until one has loved an animal a part of one’s soul remains unawakened”.Anatole France

We have the privilege to observe the human-animal bond on a daily basis, within the school and throughout our programs beyond campus. The human-animal bond is defined in a number of ways, but revolves around the mutually beneficial relationship between people and animals. It has become increasingly recognized that these bonds have important health benefits essential to both. The veterinarian’s role in the human-animal bond is to maximize the potential of this unique relationship between people and animals.

A six year old Belgian Malinois service dog from the major California police agency has his fractured upper right and left canine teeth examined by Dentistry Resident Dr. Peter Strom and  veterinary student Vivian Kuei of the VMTH Dentistry Service at the William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at the University of California Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. Photo by Don Preisler/UCDavis

A six year old Belgian Malinois service dog from the major California police agency has his fractured upper right and left canine teeth examined by Dentistry Resident Dr. Peter Strom and veterinary student Vivian Kuei of the VMTH Dentistry Service at the William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at the University of California Davis School of Veterinary Medicine.
Photo by Don Preisler/UCDavis

To enhance one aspect of the human-animal bond, our school has entered into a partnership with the UC Davis Police Department to establish the Faithful Partner Program, a fund to assist with the medical costs of treating canine officers, as well as search and rescue dogs that may be injured in the line of duty. Our hospital has an extensive history of caring for canine officers, having treated 65 police dogs in the past four years, and by offering free annual teeth and eye examinations for military and service dogs.

Read More

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén